Lower East Side Librarian

books, zines, Library of Congress subject headings, cats

71 notes &

confusedcatsagainstfeminism:

Bad Bad Leroy Brown is a huge help around the house, learning how to take care of our men until she finds one of her own. 
—

Reader submission. Confused Cats Against Feminism is brought to you by We Hunted the Mammoth, and by YOUR KITTIES. Submit!  And buy crap at the Confused Cats Store! It’s for charity!

Bad Bad Leroy Brown is a confused cat against feminism, and I am one of her humans (the lesser of us). She helps me fold clothes.

confusedcatsagainstfeminism:

Bad Bad Leroy Brown is a huge help around the house, learning how to take care of our men until she finds one of her own. 

Reader submission. Confused Cats Against Feminism is brought to you by We Hunted the Mammoth, and by YOUR KITTIES. Submit! And buy crap at the Confused Cats Store! It’s for charity!

Bad Bad Leroy Brown is a confused cat against feminism, and I am one of her humans (the lesser of us). She helps me fold clothes.

Filed under bad bad leroy brown cats feminism laundry

7 notes &

If Nothing Else the Sky by Dave Roche
You know how I am. I don’t read a lot of books by dudes, but I can make an exception for a book by a zine dude. Dave chronicles two trips/zine tours, the first to Australia and the second to Singapore, Malaysia and Indonesia (I might have missed a country or two).
I’m not much of a traveler these days, but I can still easily relate to Dave’s nervousness about how to behave in foreign cultures, self-consciousness about white American privilege and questioning his role in radical, punk communities as he ages. I had a similar conversation with my spouse when I was around 37, as Dave was when he published the book. (Sorry if I got his age wrong, but I think that’s it.) We were at the National Conference on Organized Resistance and felt like the oldest people there. We wondered if we put a damper on things with our presence, if our activism needed to take a different form now. To his credit, Dave has a lot more tolerance for going to shows and staying out all night than we did or do, which is even more impressive because he’s straightedge.
This line of thinking is present from the first page.

Am I confusing staying true to my youthful ideals with desperately clinging to my youth? Sure there’s a qualitative difference between buying a convertible and dating someone half your age and sleeping on the couches of strangers in foreign countries and sneaking to the top of railroad bridges to make out, but is the incentive the same?

Dave is an endearing character, especially when he’s interacting with animals, like how his favorite moment in Australia was when he got bitten by a penguin. (The link is to a video, not of Dave.)
You know this is a book by a zine maker when Dave writes, 

Can I confess something to you? I don’t know what I’m doing here. I don’t mean in Adelaide, I mean right now, sitting in my apartment in Chicago writing this. Why am I putting down these stories? Why will I spend money to print them? Why give them to a handful of friends and strangers who I’ll refer to as friends anyway? I’ve been involved in punk for more than half my life; the ethics and ideals punk helped me hone inform every major decision of my life. If you were to ask me why it’s so important to me, though, I wouldn’t know what to say. 

Punk values, introspection, insecurity—check, check, check!
And he’s funny, even about having Crohn’s Disease:

I want to be an organ donor but by the time I die there will be so little doctors can use they’ll probably just use my guts as packing materials when shipping healthy organs.

Zines are illegal in Singapore!

So here we were, trading zines, ones that we had made and ones we loved, apparently breaking the law. I’m not saying we were Black Flag at the Palladium, but it was nice to feel we’re still relevant. 

You’ll also be mad impressed that Dave manages to maintain his vegan diet (without being a jerk about it) throughout his travels. 
Bonus: the books is beautifully produced. 
Finished 10/17

If Nothing Else the Sky by Dave Roche

You know how I am. I don’t read a lot of books by dudes, but I can make an exception for a book by a zine dude. Dave chronicles two trips/zine tours, the first to Australia and the second to Singapore, Malaysia and Indonesia (I might have missed a country or two).

I’m not much of a traveler these days, but I can still easily relate to Dave’s nervousness about how to behave in foreign cultures, self-consciousness about white American privilege and questioning his role in radical, punk communities as he ages. I had a similar conversation with my spouse when I was around 37, as Dave was when he published the book. (Sorry if I got his age wrong, but I think that’s it.) We were at the National Conference on Organized Resistance and felt like the oldest people there. We wondered if we put a damper on things with our presence, if our activism needed to take a different form now. To his credit, Dave has a lot more tolerance for going to shows and staying out all night than we did or do, which is even more impressive because he’s straightedge.

This line of thinking is present from the first page.

Am I confusing staying true to my youthful ideals with desperately clinging to my youth? Sure there’s a qualitative difference between buying a convertible and dating someone half your age and sleeping on the couches of strangers in foreign countries and sneaking to the top of railroad bridges to make out, but is the incentive the same?

Dave is an endearing character, especially when he’s interacting with animals, like how his favorite moment in Australia was when he got bitten by a penguin. (The link is to a video, not of Dave.)

You know this is a book by a zine maker when Dave writes, 

Can I confess something to you? I don’t know what I’m doing here. I don’t mean in Adelaide, I mean right now, sitting in my apartment in Chicago writing this. Why am I putting down these stories? Why will I spend money to print them? Why give them to a handful of friends and strangers who I’ll refer to as friends anyway? I’ve been involved in punk for more than half my life; the ethics and ideals punk helped me hone inform every major decision of my life. If you were to ask me why it’s so important to me, though, I wouldn’t know what to say. 

Punk values, introspection, insecurity—check, check, check!

And he’s funny, even about having Crohn’s Disease:

I want to be an organ donor but by the time I die there will be so little doctors can use they’ll probably just use my guts as packing materials when shipping healthy organs.

Zines are illegal in Singapore!

So here we were, trading zines, ones that we had made and ones we loved, apparently breaking the law. I’m not saying we were Black Flag at the Palladium, but it was nice to feel we’re still relevant. 

You’ll also be mad impressed that Dave manages to maintain his vegan diet (without being a jerk about it) throughout his travels. 

Bonus: the books is beautifully produced. 

Finished 10/17

Filed under books read in 2014 book reviews zinesters writing books dave roche if nothing else the sky punks travel australia asia

0 notes &

Landline by Rainbow Rowell
Do you just love Rainbow Rowell’s novel? I do. Especially Fangirl. That means my expectations for Landline were high. Do you see where this is going? What a disappointment. It’s a romance novel, I guess, and one I lost my patience with almost immediately. 
At least there are some likable moments:

"Kids are perceptive, Georgie. They’re like dogs"—she offered a meatball from her own fork to the pug heaped in her lap—"they know when their people are unhappy."

There’s some dessert called puppy chow that I’d never heard of.

We’re married.
You don’t know when you’re twenty-three.
You don’t know what it really means to crawl into someone else’s life and stay there. You can’t see all the ways you’re going to get tangled,  how you’re going to bond skin to skin. How the idea of separating will feel in five years, in ten—in fifteen. When Georgie thought about divorce now, she imagined lying side by side with Neal on two operating tables will a team of doctors tried to unthread their vascular systems. 

The characters are likable, too. It’s the situation that’s meh, and you know how it’s going to end fifty pages in, but you might start rooting for something different. 
Shag: I forget the name—the pizza delivery person.Marry: NealKill: Seth
Finished 10/14

Landline by Rainbow Rowell

Do you just love Rainbow Rowell’s novel? I do. Especially Fangirl. That means my expectations for Landline were high. Do you see where this is going? What a disappointment. It’s a romance novel, I guess, and one I lost my patience with almost immediately. 

At least there are some likable moments:

"Kids are perceptive, Georgie. They’re like dogs"—she offered a meatball from her own fork to the pug heaped in her lap—"they know when their people are unhappy."

There’s some dessert called puppy chow that I’d never heard of.

We’re married.

You don’t know when you’re twenty-three.

You don’t know what it really means to crawl into someone else’s life and stay there. You can’t see all the ways you’re going to get tangled,  how you’re going to bond skin to skin. How the idea of separating will feel in five years, in ten—in fifteen. When Georgie thought about divorce now, she imagined lying side by side with Neal on two operating tables will a team of doctors tried to unthread their vascular systems. 

The characters are likable, too. It’s the situation that’s meh, and you know how it’s going to end fifty pages in, but you might start rooting for something different. 

Shag: I forget the name—the pizza delivery person.
Marry: Neal
Kill: Seth

Finished 10/14

Filed under books read in 2014 book reviews rainbow rowell landline romance novels

6 notes &

BiblioTechⒶ: Haiti Solidarity Trip Zine Report Back
A mentalist, two technologists and three librarians walk into the bar at the Prince Hotel in Haiti…
So we (finally) made this zine about our trip to Haiti in January. If you want a copy, send a donation (cash in the mail or Paypal to jennafree@bigfoot.rhymeswithbomb), and I’ll mail you one (or however many you ask for).
Crossposted from Facebook—sorry if that bothers you.
PS If you’re my friend and we always trade zines anyway, don’t worry about sending me any $.
PPS If anyone’s curious, though, any money we make from selling the zine will go to SAKALA for library materials. (Link is to a video.)

BiblioTechⒶ: Haiti Solidarity Trip Zine Report Back

A mentalist, two technologists and three librarians walk into the bar at the Prince Hotel in Haiti…

So we (finally) made this zine about our trip to Haiti in January. If you want a copy, send a donation (cash in the mail or Paypal to jennafree@bigfoot.rhymeswithbomb), and I’ll mail you one (or however many you ask for).

Crossposted from Facebook—sorry if that bothers you.

PS If you’re my friend and we always trade zines anyway, don’t worry about sending me any $.

PPS If anyone’s curious, though, any money we make from selling the zine will go to SAKALA for library materials. (Link is to a video.)

Filed under haiti zines compilation zines SAKALA FOKAL KOFAVIV DNL HELP