Lower East Side Librarian

books, zines, Library of Congress subject headings, cats

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Serendipitous Alphabetizing
(Cross-posted from Facebook, because I don’t think I have much overlap in readership.)
Today in Library of Congress Subject Heading subdivisions applied to zines held in the Barnard Zine Library…
In cataloging a zine made by Hannah Mermelstein, I added the New-to-Us LCSH Israel-Arab War,1948-1949 and subdivided it Destruction and pillage. When I added Destruction and pillage alphabetically to my spreadsheet, it fell under Description and travel, which I think is appropriate.

Serendipitous Alphabetizing

(Cross-posted from Facebook, because I don’t think I have much overlap in readership.)

Today in Library of Congress Subject Heading subdivisions applied to zines held in the Barnard Zine Library

In cataloging a zine made by Hannah Mermelstein, I added the New-to-Us LCSH Israel-Arab War,1948-1949 and subdivided it Destruction and pillage. When I added Destruction and pillage alphabetically to my spreadsheet, it fell under Description and travel, which I think is appropriate.

Filed under palestine zine cataloging lcsh

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Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng
When beloved daughter and middle sibling Lydia Lee goes missing and eventually turns up dead (not a spoiler—the first sentence in the novel is “Lydia is dead.”), her family finds itself having to deal with long-established relationship dysfunctions. Only Lydia and her older brother Nath were fully aware of the problems caused by how blatantly blue-eyed Lydia is favored by both parents over Nath and younger sister Hannah. 
The Chinese-American dad and Blonde-American mom fell in love while studying at Harvard and Radcliffe in the 1950s. Pregnancy interrupts Marilyn’s plans to be a doctor, so she ends up pinning her ambition on her first-born daughter, who after a family crisis, willingingly takes on her mother’s dreams. It’s actually Nath, though who desires a life in science and gets into Harvard. 
I don’t want to get too much more into the story, with its omniscient narration and well-paced unfolding. I didn’t dog-ear any pages, so I don’t have passages to share with you. I’ll just say, I hope this book wins some literary prizes. The novel deserves it, and if it were written by a man, reviewers would be competing to write the most glowing raves. The famously sexist NY Times hasn’t even reviewed it, though there is a piece in the NYT Magazine written by Ng.

Finished July 25

Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng

When beloved daughter and middle sibling Lydia Lee goes missing and eventually turns up dead (not a spoiler—the first sentence in the novel is “Lydia is dead.”), her family finds itself having to deal with long-established relationship dysfunctions. Only Lydia and her older brother Nath were fully aware of the problems caused by how blatantly blue-eyed Lydia is favored by both parents over Nath and younger sister Hannah. 

The Chinese-American dad and Blonde-American mom fell in love while studying at Harvard and Radcliffe in the 1950s. Pregnancy interrupts Marilyn’s plans to be a doctor, so she ends up pinning her ambition on her first-born daughter, who after a family crisis, willingingly takes on her mother’s dreams. It’s actually Nath, though who desires a life in science and gets into Harvard. 

I don’t want to get too much more into the story, with its omniscient narration and well-paced unfolding. I didn’t dog-ear any pages, so I don’t have passages to share with you. I’ll just say, I hope this book wins some literary prizes. The novel deserves it, and if it were written by a man, reviewers would be competing to write the most glowing raves. The famously sexist NY Times hasn’t even reviewed it, though there is a piece in the NYT Magazine written by Ng.

Finished July 25

Filed under books read in 2014 book reviews families mothers and daughters fathers and sons siblings celeste ng everything i never told you highly recommended Chinese American writers mixed race literary fiction

10 notes &

Happy International Zine Month Day 27!

alexwrekk:

alexwrekk:

The task for today is to organize a zine event!

I’ve been kicking around the idea of hosting a zine salon. I’m not exactly sure what it would look like, where it would be, how many people to invite, who should be my co-host, and if they should be a series of themed salons about different topics involving zines. Good idea?

+1 zine salon idea! I can imagine conversations ranging from DIY techniques in zine making to a discussion of ethics. 

Filed under izm2014 zines

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AUTOCAT again: there's a thesis on gender in here

I was struck by how the people with men’s names give solutions, some of which are hella old school and don’t seem to solve the problem exactly (and are then corrected later by other people with men’s names), where the people with women’s names offer empathy and then solutions, or shared what they tried, even if it didn’t work. 

I can imagine that there are lots of people who just want a solution, but me, I want others to share my frustration. I think the former group would ask the internet, rather than an email community, though, right? 

Filed under catalogers autocat gender lis students you're welcome

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Other things that amuse me—how getting ONE new follower makes it look like I’ve had a dramatic upswing in interest in my blog. 
Also, I like a lot of posts, apparently. 

Other things that amuse me—how getting ONE new follower makes it look like I’ve had a dramatic upswing in interest in my blog. 

Also, I like a lot of posts, apparently. 

Filed under me me me meta statistics

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  7. Another Name for Cataloger (Humor Intended) (2)

From AUTOCAT Digest - 24 Jul 2014 to 25 Jul 2014 (#2014-188). 

Am I the only one who things that’s hilarious? I think I might be. Basically, I just love how seriously people on that list take themselves, even if I hate how douchey a lot of those guys are to each other and to n00bs with questions. 

btw the backstory is that the contentious “another name/word for cataloger" thread has been going on for weeks. 

PS The other name suggested in this post is “cart ninja.”

PPS I wonder if this post is a little douchey, too. 

Filed under catalogers autocat librarianship