Saturday, April 19, 2014
For all the professors who were like, “you don’t have a PhD so why should you make as much as us?” on my keep your kisses and show me some solidarity post. 
via Sarah Roberts on Facebook

For all the professors who were like, “you don’t have a PhD so why should you make as much as us?” on my keep your kisses and show me some solidarity post. 

via Sarah Roberts on Facebook

The Days of Anna Madrigal by Armistead Maupin
I’m a sentimental fool for the Tales of the City series. Surprisingly, Days only made me cry once, whereas two books ago, even the title Michael Tolliver Lives brought tears to my eyes. 
We join Anna, Mouse and the rest of the gang as most of them are preparing for Burning Man. Yeah, but they’re all from San Francisco. For at least the second time Maupin is claiming to end the series, and this entry includes a lot of wrap up, so I’m not going to say much about the plot points. Of course it’s not truly about what happens to people, but what happens in people. Anna is 92, and the first generation of Barbary Lane denizens are in their 60s or so. Many of the characters are thinking about the end of their own personal series, and there are nods to those who are already gone. 
It’s a sweet story, and Anna Madrigal is the perfect role model for how to live well while frail. One spoiler—she still likes her weed. 
Shag: not sure—Ben maybe?
Marry: Wren
Kill: a character from Anna’s past who is already long dead anyway
Finished April 18

The Days of Anna Madrigal by Armistead Maupin

I’m a sentimental fool for the Tales of the City series. Surprisingly, Days only made me cry once, whereas two books ago, even the title Michael Tolliver Lives brought tears to my eyes. 

We join Anna, Mouse and the rest of the gang as most of them are preparing for Burning Man. Yeah, but they’re all from San Francisco. For at least the second time Maupin is claiming to end the series, and this entry includes a lot of wrap up, so I’m not going to say much about the plot points. Of course it’s not truly about what happens to people, but what happens in people. Anna is 92, and the first generation of Barbary Lane denizens are in their 60s or so. Many of the characters are thinking about the end of their own personal series, and there are nods to those who are already gone. 

It’s a sweet story, and Anna Madrigal is the perfect role model for how to live well while frail. One spoiler—she still likes her weed. 

Shag: not sure—Ben maybe?

Marry: Wren

Kill: a character from Anna’s past who is already long dead anyway

Finished April 18

Friday, April 18, 2014
xkimberlyx:

papercutzinelibrary:

Looking for a particular zine? Our online catalog is now more search-friendly and up-to-date! Search and see if we have that obscure comic zine or your embarrassing punk rag from 1997 

Alternatively, come visit me and I’ll look up anything you like AND set you up to check it out for two whole weeks!

<3 online zine catalogs!

xkimberlyx:

papercutzinelibrary:

Looking for a particular zine? Our online catalog is now more search-friendly and up-to-date! Search and see if we have that obscure comic zine or your embarrassing punk rag from 1997 

Alternatively, come visit me and I’ll look up anything you like AND set you up to check it out for two whole weeks!

<3 online zine catalogs!

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Why my ungracious response to Claire Potter’s “Kiss a Librarian” post on the Chronicle

http://chronicle.com/blognetwork/tenuredradical/2014/04/kiss-a-librarian-this-week-its-a-radical-act

Tenured Radical Claire Potter wrote a post on the Chronicle of Higher Education blog recognizing librarians, especially radical librarians on the occasion of National Library Workers Day. She encourages her faculty colleagues to kiss us. Yay! I tweeted a request for cake, but consensual kisses are along the same lines.

So why were one other commenter and I a little snarky, correcting Dr. Potter’s incomplete citation and misinterpretation of a children’s book, rather than being grateful for the acknowledgment of our awesomeness and radical politics? 

I do appreciate Dr. Potter stating that librarians are “the heartbeat of our universities” and sharing her love for archivists. And yet, it rankled. While librarians are often in a position of privilege in society, making a middle-class wage and getting to do a job we like, within the academy, we generally feel second-class, even librarians with faculty status, even librarians with Ph.Ds. What I really want from faculty is advocacy and solidarity, more than kisses, or even snacks. 

Many of us do not have a voice on college and faculty committees, are low on administrative priority lists and generally an “oh aren’t they great (but I actually have no real understanding of what they do)” glint in the eye of those with pull in our institutions. I know many faculty members don’t feel like they have much pull either, but if they look around, they’ll see that they have more than we do. 

We are undervalued and misunderstood. Some of that is on us; we’re doing our best to do better outreach to students, professors and staff, but face it, what we’re great at is supporting research, not marketing. That’s why I had a negative reaction to Dr. Potter’s post. I don’t want a pat on the head. I want some semblance of salary and authority parity. At my own institution assistant professors' average pay is higher than mine, and I've been working as a librarian for thirteen years. Yeah, I don't have a Ph.D, but I do have the terminal degree for librarianship and a professional reputation (including having published chapters in two of the books Dr. Potter mentioned) on par with associate and even full professors. 

My reaction is not strictly about me or how much money I make, it’s about feeling patronized, even infantilized. While I’m pro-kisses, what I really want is a seat at the table. 

If librarians can’t have that, the least we should expect is to have our work cited properly. 

abcnorio:

Zines from the Borderlands:Storytelling about Mixed-Heritage
at the BROOKLYN HISTORICAL SOCIETY
THURSDAY APRIL 24 at 7:00pm
How can zines create new narratives and representations for mixed-heritage people, LGBTQ communities, and people of color? What is the role of zines, storytelling and self-publishing within marginalized communities?
Come participate in a vibrant conversation about race, gender and sexuality with four zinesters, activists, and media-makers: Nia King, editor of “MXD: True Stories by Mixed Race Writers”; Daniela Capistrano, founder of POC Zine Project; Jenna Freedman, Barnard Zine Librarian; and Anne Hays, founder of Brooklyn-based zine distro, Sleeping Creatures.
Co-sponsored by ABC No Rio, the Brooklyn Zine Fest and Bluestockings Bookstore.
RSVP at www.cbbgzines.eventbrite.com
http://cbbg.brooklynhistory.org/blog/zines-borderlands-storytelling-about-mixed-heritage
at the BROOKLYN HISTORICAL SOCIETY128 Pierrepont StreetBrooklyn, NY
Image courtesy of 50 Zines by Queer People of Color, article by Daniela Capistrano and Nia King, 2013.

I&#8217;m supporting niaking &amp; the poczineproject at this event, bringing mixed heritage zines and talking about how to find them in my library and others.

abcnorio:

Zines from the Borderlands:
Storytelling about Mixed-Heritage

at the BROOKLYN HISTORICAL SOCIETY

THURSDAY APRIL 24 at 7:00pm

How can zines create new narratives and representations for mixed-heritage people, LGBTQ communities, and people of color? What is the role of zines, storytelling and self-publishing within marginalized communities?

Come participate in a vibrant conversation about race, gender and sexuality with four zinesters, activists, and media-makers: Nia King, editor of “MXD: True Stories by Mixed Race Writers”; Daniela Capistrano, founder of POC Zine Project; Jenna Freedman, Barnard Zine Librarian; and Anne Hays, founder of Brooklyn-based zine distro, Sleeping Creatures.

Co-sponsored by ABC No Rio, the Brooklyn Zine Fest and Bluestockings Bookstore.

RSVP at www.cbbgzines.eventbrite.com

http://cbbg.brooklynhistory.org/blog/zines-borderlands-storytelling-about-mixed-heritage

at the BROOKLYN HISTORICAL SOCIETY
128 Pierrepont Street
Brooklyn, NY

Image courtesy of 50 Zines by Queer People of Color, article by Daniela Capistrano and Nia King, 2013.

I’m supporting niaking & the poczineproject at this event, bringing mixed heritage zines and talking about how to find them in my library and others.
Tuesday, April 15, 2014
Night Broken by Patricia Briggs
This is pretty far along in the Mercy Thompson series, so there&#8217;s no point in my giving you the background. You&#8217;ve read them and you know what&#8217;s up, or you haven&#8217;t. If it&#8217;s the latter, and you like paranormal fiction with strong female protagonists, get to it. 
Those of you who didn&#8217;t place your library hold on Night Broken as quickly as I did, the deal with this one is that Adam&#8217;s manipulative ex-wife is back in town, and brought a dangerous stalker with her. Mercy is not psyched. Luckily her dad is around to help out, in his wacky, indirect way.  
Shag: Adam, I suppose, or Mercy. All of the werewolves seem pretty shaggable. 
Marry: Warren
Kill: Guayota&#8212;what a delusional meanie!
Finished April 15

Night Broken by Patricia Briggs

This is pretty far along in the Mercy Thompson series, so there’s no point in my giving you the background. You’ve read them and you know what’s up, or you haven’t. If it’s the latter, and you like paranormal fiction with strong female protagonists, get to it. 

Those of you who didn’t place your library hold on Night Broken as quickly as I did, the deal with this one is that Adam’s manipulative ex-wife is back in town, and brought a dangerous stalker with her. Mercy is not psyched. Luckily her dad is around to help out, in his wacky, indirect way.  

Shag: Adam, I suppose, or Mercy. All of the werewolves seem pretty shaggable. 

Marry: Warren

Kill: Guayota—what a delusional meanie!

Finished April 15

deadstaplers:

Stapler 42 is dead. Cause of death: exhaustion. It was 53 days old.

I love this blog so much. Half the reason I advocated for killing the reference desk at Barnard was staplers. The other half was the printers.

deadstaplers:

Stapler 42 is dead. Cause of death: exhaustion. It was 53 days old.

I love this blog so much. Half the reason I advocated for killing the reference desk at Barnard was staplers. The other half was the printers.