Lower East Side Librarian

books, zines, Library of Congress subject headings, cats

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She Loves You, She Loves You Not… by Julie Anne Peters
Protagonist Alyssa has been rejected by everyone who matters—dumped by her girlfriend for her best friend and kicked out of her house for being a lesbian. She ends up with her estranged mother, whose career involves wearing a lot of stilettos. Alyssa doesn’t know what to make of her new situation and is bratty at first. 
She eventually gets a job, kisses a new girl and makes peace with the major players in her life. It’s not as much of a weepy as Keeping You a Secret and few of the primary characters are very sympathetic. Probably just Arlo, and secondary character Geena. 
Finished 7/19

She Loves You, She Loves You Not… by Julie Anne Peters

Protagonist Alyssa has been rejected by everyone who matters—dumped by her girlfriend for her best friend and kicked out of her house for being a lesbian. She ends up with her estranged mother, whose career involves wearing a lot of stilettos. Alyssa doesn’t know what to make of her new situation and is bratty at first. 

She eventually gets a job, kisses a new girl and makes peace with the major players in her life. It’s not as much of a weepy as Keeping You a Secret and few of the primary characters are very sympathetic. Probably just Arlo, and secondary character Geena. 

Finished 7/19

Filed under books read in 2014 book reviews lesbians YA fiction diversity in ya mothers and daughters sex workers

39 notes &

lazinefest:

"The library at Pacific Northwest College of Art ( (PNCA) serves a community of approximately 500 BFA, MFA, and MA students, 200 staff and faculty, continuing education students, and innumerable alumni…
Patrons use the library’s nearly 900-issue circulating zine collection for entertainment, education, and inspiration. Students create zines in PNCA courses, write and publish zines for their theses, and are active in independent publishing. Most of our zines are acquired through donations from their creators or zine collectors. Common themes in our zine collection are comics, art, design, Portland and the Pacific Northwest, feminism, radicalism, GLBTQ topics, pop culture, music, and political activism.”
 
Read the rest and check out more pictures here!

Always reblog zine library photos!

lazinefest:

"The library at Pacific Northwest College of Art ( (PNCA) serves a community of approximately 500 BFA, MFA, and MA students, 200 staff and faculty, continuing education students, and innumerable alumni…
Patrons use the library’s nearly 900-issue circulating zine collection for entertainment, education, and inspiration. Students create zines in PNCA courses, write and publish zines for their theses, and are active in independent publishing. Most of our zines are acquired through donations from their creators or zine collectors. Common themes in our zine collection are comics, art, design, Portland and the Pacific Northwest, feminism, radicalism, GLBTQ topics, pop culture, music, and political activism.”
 
Read the rest and check out more pictures here!

Always reblog zine library photos!

(via papercutzinelibrary)

Filed under zine libraries pnca

15 notes &

Happy International Zine Month Day 22!

alexwrekk:

The task for today is to send your zine to a zine library!

I wouldn’t mind two copies for the Barnard Zine Library, if they fit our collection policy:

Barnard’s zines are written by women (cis- and transgender) with an emphasis on zines by women of color. We collect zines on feminism and femme identity by people of all genders. The zines are personal and political publications on activism, anarchism, body image, third wave feminism, gender, parenting, queer community, riot grrrl, sexual assault, trans experience, and other topics.

I’ll send you something nice in thanks/trade. 

Filed under izm2014 barnard zine library zine libraries

1 note &

The People’s Republic of Desire by Rui (or Annie?) Wong
Wong’s book seems to be comprised of articles from her column of the same name from the South China Morning Post. I was expecting something with more of a through-line and was disappointed in the choppy-feeling narrative where entries sometimes referred to a character or action that weren’t explained until later.
Wong’s writing is enjoyable enough, but I wasn’t so interested in her subjects—young and less young women looking for love, lust and success. The book is billed as a Chinese Sex and the City, which is not inaccurate. The problem is the core of friendship and support that saves SatC from being too shallow is lacking. 
Or maybe it’s just my American mindset that keeps me from properly appreciating Desire. Wang differentiates US and Chinese culture, “In the States, old is precious because the country is so young, the exact opposite of China, where old things are seen as roadblocks to the future.” 
Finished 7/16

The People’s Republic of Desire by Rui (or Annie?) Wong

Wong’s book seems to be comprised of articles from her column of the same name from the South China Morning Post. I was expecting something with more of a through-line and was disappointed in the choppy-feeling narrative where entries sometimes referred to a character or action that weren’t explained until later.

Wong’s writing is enjoyable enough, but I wasn’t so interested in her subjects—young and less young women looking for love, lust and success. The book is billed as a Chinese Sex and the City, which is not inaccurate. The problem is the core of friendship and support that saves SatC from being too shallow is lacking. 

Or maybe it’s just my American mindset that keeps me from properly appreciating Desire. Wang differentiates US and Chinese culture, “In the States, old is precious because the country is so young, the exact opposite of China, where old things are seen as roadblocks to the future.” 

Finished 7/16

Filed under books read in 2014 book reviews china annie wang people's republic of desire dnf essays

14 notes &

kellymce:

Appropriately for International Zine Libraries Day, I’m gonna share my thoughts on the 6th Zine Librarian (un)Conference, which wrapped up on Saturday. 

This weekend, I thought a lot about the cheeseball networking advice about finding your “tribe.” I’ve said before, zines aren’t a huge part of my job, and probably never will be, but zine librarians have helped me with all areas of my professional work. Just a sampling, off the top of my head: zine librarians have helped me prep for job interviews, grow through issues of pedagogy, talk out workplace conflicts, and think about whether I’d ever want to get into management. Forming these connections — over collections that we are all passionate about — has given me a network of colleagues at really different places in their careers, who do really different types of things. Like the GLBTRT, zine librarians are a cross-sampling of academic, public and barefoot librarians (folks at grassroots libraries, often without an MLIS), folks who do really different work. I’ll be honest — it is often easy for me to zone out when cataloging comes up, but I get so excited hearing my wise colleagues share their knowledge and move us closer towards building a union catalogue that will help researchers locate a zine across all kinds of institutions. Linked data isn’t really in my wheelhouse, but man, this will be amaaaaazing! It is an honor to get to work on projects with these folks whose expertise is So Different from mine. 

Also, we get things done without getting too serious — our metadata standard is xZINECOREx for a reason. This weekend, when someone suggested creating a taskforce to work on our burgeoning code of ethics, I objected to the language…so it is a Fast Horse instead. (You can see the Zotero group for the lit review here.) Someone was dressed as the Goblin King all weekend, as part of the rewards for the Kickstarter campaign she used to fund her trip out to Durham. 

Specifically, some of my favorite parts of this weekend were:

  • Finally meeting my doppleganger — and amazing ZL(u)C organizer — Kelly Wooten, and getting to see zines from the Sallie Bingham Center.
  • Hearing about the amaaaaaazing programming and outreach that my colleagues do. Lots of ideas to steal from papercutzinelibrary, like a One Pager Rager, an event where everyone brings one-page zines to trade. The opportunity to share programming and teaching ideas from archives to community organizations to public and academic libraries is priceless. I wish it happened more throughout libraryland. 
  • Starting to work on this code of ethics, and talking about the reasons why zines and zine libraries are weird and emotional and a place for us to declare our non-neutrality.
  • Brainstorming lots of exciting things, including a review zine/zineography of sexual health zines (in part as a tool for working with sexual health educators, like I’ve done with folks in our student health unit). 
  • Reading my dorky zine out loud at the reading, and getting everyone in the bar to say “lististics” with me. 
  • Getting to hang out with old friends, and meet lots of new friends, too. 

The ZL(u)C is always a lovefest — it’s hard to leave, like heading home from camp, but also just exciting to know that we’re building new things, too. If you have any interest in zines and libraries, please join us!

P.S. Don’t forget to treat your local zine librarian to a donut today, or at least stop in and read a zine or two at your local zine library. Shoutout to Monuts in Durham for the awesome treats we had on Saturday morning!

Thanks to Kelly for writing up the Zine LIbrarians (un)Conference. I’m still too recovering to make a report back. And now I don’t have to. SO MUCH LOVE. 

Filed under kelly mcelroy zine librarians zluc conference report backs

1 note &

Not Your Ordinary Wolf Girl by Emily Pohl-Weary
I hadn’t realized until just now that NYPL ILLed this book from Brooklyn Public for me. Oh, poor NYPL. 
Introverted vegetarian teen rock star Sam Lee finds herself craving meat after being attacked by dogs while riding her bike through Central Park. That’s really all you need to know. I say that with love and respect, for this werewolf novel in what I hope will be a series, though not atypical of the genre has a likable narrator and shows a real understanding of the punky NYC subculture it depicts.shag: Marlonmarry: Marikakill: Owen
Finished July 13

Not Your Ordinary Wolf Girl by Emily Pohl-Weary

I hadn’t realized until just now that NYPL ILLed this book from Brooklyn Public for me. Oh, poor NYPL. 

Introverted vegetarian teen rock star Sam Lee finds herself craving meat after being attacked by dogs while riding her bike through Central Park. That’s really all you need to know. I say that with love and respect, for this werewolf novel in what I hope will be a series, though not atypical of the genre has a likable narrator and shows a real understanding of the punky NYC subculture it depicts.

shag: Marlon
marry: Marika
kill: Owen

Finished July 13

Filed under books read in 2014 book reviews recommended werewolves paranormal fiction YA emily pohl-weary not your ordinary wolf girl